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Environment in the News



Environment in the News
Restricting Pesticide Use for Salmon Recovery?
Jeff Barnard, Associated Press
"Farms and orchards that continue to use three pesticides that kill salmon will have to greatly expand buffer zones around their fields so the chemicals don’t reach streams, federal biologists ruled Tuesday... Acting under terms of a lawsuit brought by anti-pesticide groups and salmon fishermen, NOAA Fisheries Service issued findings under the Endangered Species Act that the organophosphate chemicals malathion, diazinon and chlorpyrifos jeopardize the survival of all 28 species of Pacific salmon listed as threatened or endangered in the West..." – with a link to The Register-Guard
Nov 20, 2008


Environment in the News
Germany and France Ban Pesticides Linked To Bee Deaths; Geneticist Urges U.S. Ban
Envirnomental News Network
"Now most apiarists and scientists realize that pesticides are a factor in CCD...come less than a month after Germany's ban of clothianidin, a pesticide commonly used to keep insects off of corn crops. Germany banned the pesticide after heaps of dead bees were found near fields of corn coated in the pesticide, and in response to scientists who report that the insecticide severely impairs, and often kills, the honeybees that corn and other crops depend on for pollination... The German government took the extraordinary action to protect bees and other essential pollinators, stating that there is now enough compelling evidence connecting the chemical to Bee Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) in that country." -with a link to ENN.com
Jun 25, 2008


Environment in the News
LNG Terminal Carries Long-term Threats
Don B. Henning
"I cannot understand why 'the fix' appears to be in for proposals to site LNG facilities on the Columbia when similar proposals have been rejected for good reasons in California, Washington and Mexico... It appears large vested private money interests are behind these proposals to create an entirely new bulk energy importation stream for interstate markets and that these business interests will continue to push these plans forward without due regard to the welfare or safety of Oregon’s citizens, environment and economies." –with a link to the Hilsboro Argus/oldnorthcoastoregon.com
Mar 20, 2008


Environment in the News
West Coast Salmon Season Imperiled by Low Stocks
David B. Wood, The Christian Science Monitor
"Dave Bitts, a Eureka-based salmon trawler for more than 30 years, says he could lose half his yearly income, and coastal towns from Oregon to the Mexico border will lose a mainstay of their economy and culture. Savina Duran, manager of Sea Harvest restaurant in Moss Landing, Calif., says diners will have to forgo a hot-ticket menu choice – wild, fresh, local salmon – for cheaper, farm-grown varieties from elsewhere. Steve Scheiblauer, harbor master for Monterey, Calif., says the town could lose the quaintness of a coastal California fishing village as fleets of fishing boats disappear from the harbor. Their concerns come with the cutback – and possible shutdown – of ocean salmon fishing in California and Oregon. It could happen because US government assessments showed the spawning chinook at half the minimum number needed for current statewide industry demand. A total shutdown of salmon fishing – one of three options to be decided by April 6 – would be the biggest fishing closure in West Coast history, experts say..." – with a link to The Christian Science Monitor
Mar 20, 2008


Environment in the News
Top 100 Weirdest Amphibians List Launched
New Scientist
"They have tentacles coming out of their heads, live underground for months on end, do not need to feed for up to 10 years, and survived whatever killed the dinosaurs. The Zoological Society of London in the UK has launched the top 100 list of the world's weirdest, most wonderful and rarest amphibians.'They're extraordinary survivors,' says Helen Meredith of ZSL. 'Ninety percent of our top 100 amphibians survived the extinction of the dinosaurs.' Yet they are also in dire need of help to ensure they will continue to survive." -with a link to ENN.com
Jan 22, 2008


Environment in the News
The Klamath River De-dammed?
Jeff Barnard, Associated Press
Will there be a historic solution? Maybe... "The plan contains no provision for paying the estimated $180 million to remove the dams, leaving that to PacifiCorp.'What we've come up with is a blueprint for how to solve the Klamath crisis,' said Craig Tucker, Klamath Campaign coordinator for the Karuk Tribe, which has been working for years to restore dwindling salmon catches that were once key to members' diet and culture... 'We wanted to put together a plan that keeps fishing communities whole and farm communities whole,' he said. 'The only thing standing in the way of where we are today and resolution is Warren Buffett's Klamath dams.' -with a link to ap.google.com
Jan 22, 2008


Environment in the News
The Two Faces of the Environmental Protection Agency
The Associated Press
In a stunning example of the mixed political influences at our premier federal environmental agency, environmentalists, Oregon's Governor Kulongoski and the EPA are all objecting to the BLM's current WOP and it's a mess. Meanwhile the EPA is blocking the States of California and Oregon and 14 others' efforts to upgrade controls of fuel emissions. Where is the sense? Two links from our front page to Governor EPA Weigh BLM Logging Plan and California Leaders Blast EPA at Briefing -thanks to Oregon Wild and KCRA.com
Jan 14, 2008


Environment in the News
Panel Snuffs Field-burning Ban
Diane Dietz, The Register-Guard
In a shocking reversal of public health and responsibility, Oregon's Environmental Quality Commission "declined" to order an immediate ban on grass-seed field burning filed by the Lane County Board of Commissioners: "Faye Stewart, Lane County commissioner, signed the most recent letter asking the Environmental Quality Commission for a swift ban on field burning. 'I don't think either I or Faye Stewart are wild-eyed extremists,' Galpern, the attorney, said... 'We're interested in providing some minimal protections from (smoke) in the southern Willamette Valley.' " –with a thanks and a link to The Register-Guard and an encouragement to write your support to the Lane Co. Board of Commissioners
Aug 17, 2007


Environment in the News
Manual Lawn Mowers Are Making a Comeback
Don Babwin, Associated Press
How to keep the green: "Powerful, loud mowers have been showing lawns who's boss for decades. But now contraptions that couldn't cut butter without a good shove are quietly -- really quietly -- making a comeback... Manual lawn mowers, long the 98-pound weaklings of the tool shed, are pushing their way, or, more accurately, being pushed around more yards all over the country." –with a link to ENN
May 10, 2007


Environment in the News
UN Scientists Warn Time Is Running Out to Tackle Global Warming
David Adam, environment correspondent for The Guardian
The good news is there is still hope. The bad news is how to make industries and governments responsive: "Governments are running out of time to address climate change and to avoid the worst effects of rising temperatures, an influential UN panel warned yesterday... Greater energy efficiency, renewable electricity sources and new technology to dump carbon dioxide underground can all help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, the experts said. But there could be as little as eight years left to avoid a dangerous global average rise of 2C or more." –with a thanks and a link to The Guardian
May 4, 2007


Environment in the News
Study Shows Trawlers Cut Fish Numbers in Oregon
Jeff Barnard, Associated Press
"Scientists taking a new look at old videotapes of the muddy seafloors off southern Oregon found that places showing tracks from the nets of fishing trawlers had fewer numbers and kinds of fish than areas that were undisturbed... Other studies worldwide have documented the damage bottom trawling does to seafloor habitats, but this is the first to look at fish numbers and diversity on muddy seafloors on the West Coast's Continental Shelf, where bottom trawlers do much of their work, the study authors said." –with a thanks and a link to ENN and a hint--in some browsers you will need to scroll down past the ads
May 4, 2007


Environment in the News
Coyote in Downtown Salem Shot
Associated Press
This kind of story is becoming more common: as the new houses and malls spring up, farther and farther from the core of town, valuable habitat is lost. It is when the place-names like Deer Field, Quail Run and Coyote Canyon are used for new developments, you know they are not homes for these animals any more. Pity the poor critters made homeless by us humans. –with a link to The Register-Guard
Mar 8, 2007


Environment in the News
3 Southern Oregon Cougars Mistakenly Killed
The Associated Press
"State officials say they made a big mistake in their study of cougar complaints in Jackson County: An agent killed three cougars 2.5 miles outside the boundaries of the study area... Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife discovered the mistake Friday when biologists were plotting the locations of the cougar killings on a map. On Monday the agency suspended trapping and killing cougars as part of the study." – with a thanks to AP and The Medford Tribune and a link to The Register-Guard
Mar 8, 2007


Environment in the News
Asian Air Pollution Effects West Coast Weather
Robert Lee Hotz, Los Angeles Times
"Satellite measurements reveal that high-altitude storm clouds over the northern Pacific have increased up to 50 percent over the past 20 years as new factories, vehicles and power plants in China and India spew growing amounts of microscopic pollutant particles... The resulting changes have altered how rain droplets form and helped foster the creation of imposing formations over the northern Pacific known as 'deep convective clouds...' The clouds create powerful updrafts that spawn fiercer thunderstorms and more intense rainfall, particularly through the winter months..." –with a link to The Register-Guard
Mar 8, 2007


Environment in the News
Airline Industry Could Save Thousands of Dollars by Recycling
The Associated Press
Half the fun is getting there: "The airline industry wastes hundreds of thousands of dollars each year by discarding 4,250 tons of aluminum cans and other items that could be recycled, a new report says... The two-year study by the Natural Resources Defense Council examined recycling efforts at 30 U.S. airports. The report found that the industry threw out 9,000 tons of plastic and enough newspapers and magazines to fill a football field to a depth of more than 230 feet." – with a link to ENN
Dec 15, 2006


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